I have no problem taking pictures of the food I cook, but for some reason, I totally have a brain fart when it comes to photographing my more craft-orientated projects. So I’m going to do a few quick posts to catch up on my current and recently completed projects. Today’s post focus on the knitting, the next will focus on the sewing projects.

Project #1 – Salina Sweater from Rowan’s Vintage Knits.

Salina Sweater - Collar

Pretty much the entirety of my Christmas vacation in Maine was spent working on the front portion of this sweater. I was a little iffy about the color at first – I bought it off the internet and it wassuppossedly a pale blue, but in reality is a very pale grey with a lovely rainbow tweed flecks. In any case, it will be something different in the sea of green sweaters Iam no longer allowed to buy/make.

I haven’t casted on the sleeves yet, because I’m taking/took a break to work on two items I actually need/needed.  See projects #2 and #3.

 Project #2 – MK Carroll’s Tillie Cloche 

 Tillie Hat Millie Hat - assemetrical brim in back

A week before Christmas, I lost my favorite warm hat to the CTA. It was a lovely maroon crocheted bobbly thing that was purchased at a church craft fair as a Christmas gift by a family friend several years ago. But alas, it is no more. It is, however, still cold in Chicago and my windowpane-style beret, wasn’t cutting it in the wind. So I needed a new hat, fast.

Thanks to the beauty that is Ravelry I was able to find an excellent cloche pattern by MK Carroll.  Thanks to the awesomeness that is Mr. Cleaver I got some lovely yarn for Christmas and pretty much instantaneously went to knitting it up. I made it through the crown and half of the brim before we even left Maine.

But the brim, oh boy, did I have trouble with that brim. Which is no one’s  fault but my own.

First – I did not use any of the suggest yarns, instead I used Reynold’s Lite Lopi, but I did do gauge check and adjusted accordingly. My problem was that I arbitrarily decided that after the initial decrease and increase on the brim that I would say “to hell!” with the pattern and just eyeball the length. Let us just say that this decision did not work out well and was woefully long on the first and second attempts. There was much grafting, ungrafting, weeping and gnashing of teeth.

In the end however, my ears are warm and I really like the hat. It’s not 100% done in the above photos. I haven’t blocked it lacking a head form other than my own and I haven’t added the i-cord trim, but it’s cold outside and like all my projects minute finishing can wait until I’ve worn the thing a half dozen times.

Project #3 – Hello Yarn’s Squirrel and Oak Leaf Mittens 

Squirrel Mitten

I lost my warm hat and a month later I had made a new one. I lost my warm gloves and it’s taken me oh, eight months to replace them.

That’s because the last pair of mittens I made were so disastrous that I refuse to display them here. Well, since Mr. Cleaver was getting me yarn for a hat, I batted my eyelids, looked at him with sad puppy eyes and got a few more skeins for a pair of  mittens to match the hat.

Now I still look at those two skeins of yarn in the photo above and think – surely those would be sufficently contrasting to make a pair of Norwegian-style mittens, surely! The purple is so bright and the grey is so, well, grey! However, as is evidenced in the same above photo this is clearly not the case. So my squirrel mittens are subtle.

But I’m okay with this, figuring that since this is my first colorwork pattern (which I’m really enjoying) it’s okay to be subtle, since the mistakes will be less obvious. And as, one of the ladies in my knitting group said on Tuesday – they’re like “Magic Eye” mittens, stare long enough and you’ll see the image. And I quite like that idea.

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